Tips and Tactics to Increase Your Productivity on Stillwater: Part 2 of 4

Part 2 of 4: Stillwater Presentation Tactics

I have observed that anglers who employ particular presentation tactics on lakes consistently outfish those who don’t. In Part 2 of this series, I share with you these presentation tips and tactics that will increase your productivity when fishing stillwater.

I. Continually move on the water

The more fish see your fly, the greater your potential for hookups. If you are not getting hit after a few casts, move to another location. When you do start getting strikes and/or hook ups, cast in a 360-degree pattern around you before moving. Don’t cast repeatedly into the same spot as that will scatter trout because of the surface disturbance. Move to another location once the strikes begin to diminish.

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Trout landed using Vickie’s Burnt Orange Predator Bugger

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Vickie’s Burnt Orange Predator Bugger

II. Master the skill of casting long distances

Long casts are essential when:
1. The water is flat, and the sun is overhead
2. Fish are feeding on or near the surface
3. Water is gin clear
4. Fish are feeding in shallow areas
© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved
Casting 60 feet will avoid spooking fish and increases the time the fly will be presented to prospective trout thereby increasing the number of trout that may see your fly. When there is surface ripple, low light conditions, or when the water is tinted with algae, a 40-foot cast is adequate.

III. Target the feeding zone based on the time of day and time of year

1. In early June, when the water warms up mid-morning and triggers hatches, I present the pupae stage of the aquatic insects just below the surface.

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Trout caught on the Vickie’s Brown Caddis All Purpose Nymph

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Vickie’s Brown Caddis All Purpose Nymph

2. During summer, cast from the water to the shallow shoreline areas at first light and late in the day. During midday when trout show on the surface, target shallow areas of 2-6 feet since trout move away from shoreline edges once the sun is on the water.

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Trout caught using Vickie’s Black UV Emerger

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Vickie’s Black UV Emerger

3. During hot summer months, try fishing drop-offs into deeper oxygen-rich areas which offer refuge from warmer shallow waters which have lower oxygen levels.

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Trout caught with Vickie’s Olive with Burnt Orange Tail Predator Leech

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Vickie’s Olive with Burnt Orange Tail Predator Leech

4. In fall, I fish streamers at first light and at dusk along the shallow shoreline areas where large brown trout and rainbows cruise.

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Fish hooked near the shoreline

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Trout caught with Vickie’s Brown Predator Minnow

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Vickie’s Brown Predator Minnow

5. During the cooler winter and spring months, I wait to fish midday, allowing the sun to warm the water temperature. I then fish chironomids vertically up through the top 6 feet of water.

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Trout caught with Vickie’s Blood Red UV Midge

© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reserved

Vickie’s Blood Red UV Midge

At the end of season I had to chip away ice to launch the pontoon boat! Guess it is time to go home!© 2019 Stillwater Adventures. All rights reservedIf you have any questions, let me know and I may include your question to future blog articles.

Stay tuned for Part 3 which will focus on Leaders and Tippets!

 

 

 

 

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